Rise and Shrine

July 12, 2019

Feel Good Friday

Shintoism is an ancient religion of Japan that continues to guide the Japanese way of life today. Shinto gods or spirits take form in things and concepts important to life— such as the wind, rain, mountains, rivers and fertility. There is a focus on living harmoniously with all spirits throughout nature. Over 80,000 Shinto shrines fill the country to house each spirit and serve as a place to worship them. Many of these shrines are connected to Buddhist temples and together they have created a shrine'ing example of the strong Shinto-Buddhist relationship that has formed throughout the country.

Come rain...

Or shrine

Temples and shrines are sacred places to step out of the “ordinary” world and deepen the connection with the spirits from the natural world.

Japan kimo’nos the importance of preserving a culture that remains closely connected with nature…

And Traveler Heidi wanted to extend that connection to you too.

Here’s to letting Japan's unique culture shrine through and to feeling good—because after all, it's Friday!

-Jack & Alley, Co-Founders

PS. Plus a few more fabric finds to rise and shrine to this beautiful Friday morning...

Photos: Scenes of Kyoto, Japan by Traveler Madoka Weldon.




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